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The title is actually supposed to be Nøkken Maker, but DeviantArt doesn't accept Scandinavian letters in deviation titles.
Here's another dressup game based on Norwegian folklore. You could say this is almost like a male counterpart to the Huldra game, except Nøkken is a bit more sinister.

Nøkken (pronounced Nuck-en) is an evil male creature that lives in dark waterlily ponds. When the sun has gone down, it comes to the edge of the water to lure people - especially women and children - into the water so they drown. In most fairytales about him he uses a violin (sometimes a harp, but the violin is more common) to play beautiful music to lure his victims into his pond. In Sweden he is usually depicted as a beautiful naked man, while in Norway he's mostly depicted as a creature made of twigs with glowing eyes. I did my best to combine the two, partly because the Norwegian Nøkken wouldn't be a very good basis for a character creator since you'd only be able to create an ugly monster and nothing remotely human, while the Swedish version on its own is kind of boring and unoriginal designwise in my opinion since it's just a naked human-looking man with no real distinguishing features (no offense to Swedes). He is also a shapeshifter, and often turns himelf into a tree floating in the water, or into a white horse, making people ride him and then takes them into the water when they're on his back, quite similar to the Kelpie from Celtic myths. In some myths you can also sacrifice something to him (Either a black animal, brandy, snuff, or three drops of blood from the ring finger) and he'll either teach you how to play the violin as good as him, or he'll give you his violin.
Nøkken is very often mixed up with Fossegrimen, which is a similar creature who's described as a beautiful naked man with flowing hair who plays a violin and dwells near waterfalls and rivers, but they are not the same thing. Fossegrimen is not a bloodthirsty monster, just a poetic elf who likes to play music. Fossegrimen may be mischievous, but unlike Nøkken he's not evil. It's easier to spot the differences between the two in Norwegian folklore since Nøkken looks more like a monster here, but in Swedish folklore they're extremely similar and can be easily mistaken for each other.
Sadly there aren't a lot of paintings of Nøkken, so I mostly just went with how I've personally imagined him looking, and for some reason I've always imagined him as a classy-looking gentleman with glowing eyes, playing his violin. The glowing eyes are inspired by the famous Nøkken painting by Theodor Kittelsen. ( upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia… )
Yes, this is another bloodthirsty fairytale figure. I have no idea why, but a lot of the supernatural creatures in Norwegian folklore are very sinister. =S Even our trolls are generally more sinister than the Swedish or Danish ones.

One little issue with this one was the tusser; I had decided to include tusser as drag&drop background figures along with hulders and trolls and whatnot. Problem is, I have absolutely no idea what a tusse looks like, they're not very often featured in fairytales, you often hear the phrase "tusser and trolls", but all you ever see are trolls. So I decided to ask Mr. Google, and I found out they're also known as "the invisible ones". *facepalm* In any case, I decided to include them anyway. When they do appear to humans the few descriptions I could find said that they were a bit smaller than humans, often wore green clothes, and were sort of similar to nisser but also sort of similar to hulders, so I went with something in between there. They also love nature, so I made them as naturey as I could.
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:icontopiel:
topiel Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2014

 
Oh wow, I have never imagined than I would find something so perfect on the internet. It's like someone else wrote before in the comments: My dream come true! I love water spirits, especially male water spirits. In the slavic mythology we have a similar water demon. He is called utopiec or topielec in Poland ('topiel' means  whirlpool), the czech version is called 'vodnik' (in many slavic languages this word is also used to mean the Aquarius zodiac sign). The interesting thing is, that these demons are very similar to your vision of nøkken. Utopiec and vodnik are consider to be original demons, who drown people in swamps and lakes, while topielec is a sipirit of drowned man (often a suicide) or unbaptised child, however still can be dengerous. But basically all of them have pale or grey skin and long, tangled hair. Depends on a local story - they can be very ugly, like corpses of a drowned man or rather handsome, but pale, with interdigital webbing. I like the second version better :) A creature like this is also the main character of my 'forever on hiatus' novel. I can't draw but I can create a nøkken which is very similar to my character so have to thank you for this opportunity.
P.S. Sadly, the slavic water demons can't play on fiddle...
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:iconniobesnuppa:
Niobesnuppa Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2014
Interesting.
The topielec sound a bit like draugen from Norwegian folklore; the spirt of a drowned man who tries to drag others under, though draugen only lives in the ocean, not in freshwater lakes.
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:icontopiel:
topiel Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2014
Yes, but in general there are more similarities between nøkken and slavic deamons.  Utopiec/topielec/vodnik are always  fresh water demons, just like nøkken (personally I prefer fresh water demons than ocean creatures). Vodník have gill, webbed membrane between their fingers and their skin is algae-green in colour (as well as their hair, which is typically of pale green tone). Their overall dress and appearance is weird, sometimes even resembling a vagrant; patchy shirts and (by modern standards) odd hats.The vodník's face is usually unshaven and it is not uncommon for a vodník to have a large, wet, tangled beard. So...very like your version of nøkken. The slavic water demons aren't shapeshifters but in the past people sacrificed to them horses and other animals. (There is a interesting connection between european water demons and horses: there is the water horse - kelpie, nøkken can turn into a horse and you have to sacrifice a horse to please vodník or utopiec). Both utopiec and vodník are also very untrustful and bitter just like nøkken. There is a poem about nøkken's personality I like very much (but he is called neckar, becuase this is an English poem from XIX century, I believe that nøkken stared to be known in Englad after Vinkings' conquest, but they changed his name to neckar, because it sounds more local. Tell me if I'm right).

Where by the marishes boometh the bittern,

Neckar the soulless one sits with his ghittern.

Sits inconsolable, friendless and foeless.

Waiting his destiny, - Neckar the soulless-  "Brother Fabian's Manuscript" by Sebastian Evans

P.S. There is an old czech cartoon called
'Vodyanoy', which shows vodnik in a family friendly manner. Utopiec is present in a polish video game called 'The Witcher'.
P.S.2 For the first time I read about näcken in a swedish book for children  called  Alla vi barn i Bullerbyn: one of the main characters, a young boy called Lasse pretends to be a näcken to scare his friends. However, in the polish version word näcken is translated to vodník, so eventually when I grown up I taught that it wasn't czech vodnik, but swedish näcken.

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:iconniobesnuppa:
Niobesnuppa Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2014
Interesting.
Im not sure, to be honest. I dont really know what Nøkken was called in the Viking age, though I suppose it is possible. Another bit of trivia is that the Vikings also settled in much of eastern Europe, so maybe they spread those myths to the Slavic people?

I see.
Thats quite interesting. Its fun to see how all the European myths and traditions are related in some way.
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:icontopiel:
topiel Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2014
I rather doubt it, because Vikings have never established a country in the Easter Europe. The only exception is Russia, but they were a minority there, so they were quickly assimilated. I see two other possibilities 1. Slavic people were living close to the continental Germanic tribes and their religion was close to the religion of Vikings, but again…we can't be sure if Germanic tribes borrowed from Slavic tribes or vice versa,  and this explain mainly believes of western Slavic (because they had more contact with Germanic tribes), while water demons of this kind were popular also among northern and southern Slavs. I learned that  names of similar demons varies  from country to country (czech-slovac: vodník, serbian: vodenjak, russian: wodjanoj, wodylnik. For example in Poland even different regions have their own names: utopiec, topielec, łobasta, topik, wirnik, pływnik, topic, topnik, utopnik, utoplec, utopek, topek, waserman (pervious German territories). This kind of demon seems too popular to be imported ;) Also: the Slavic mythology is very deeply connected to nature. There are hundreds of different creatures: demons connected to farmhouse, lakes, rivers, fields, forests and even sky demons called latawce. It seems natural that there were original fresh water demons  2. The second theory is much simpler. Almost all European mythologies have their origin in the  Proto-Indo-European religion, that is why they are similar, (but yet unique).
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:iconniobesnuppa:
Niobesnuppa Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2014
Scandinavian folklore is also very deeply connected to nature, not surprising since Scandinavia pretty much only consists of nature with hardly any people and cities.
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:icontopiel:
topiel Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2014
Yes, I know. I think that is why Scandinavian folklore is so beautiful to me :)
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:iconrostiaper:
rostiaper Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I love this one. <3
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:iconljxreader:
LJxReader Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2014  Student Artist
This reminds me of Jinxx from Black Veil Brides. :D
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:iconclarentinthia:
Clarentinthia Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
You introduced me to some of the greatest mythological creatures, I never knew that Norway had such fascinating mythology. Your work inspires me to write a story about them, thank you.

Honestly, I'm rather shocked how ignorant  some of the comments you receive are. That must be irritating, hahah. 
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